Tracks Description

Track Chairs:

  • Marco Marabelli, Bentley University, US, mmarabelli@bentley.edu
  • M. Lynne Markus, Bentley University, US, mlmarkus@bentley.edu
  • Sue Newell, Warwick University, UK, Sue.Newell@wbs.ac.uk

Track Description:

The mission of the IS field, since its founding, has been to promote to the effective design, introduction, and use of information technology (IT). When IT was young and confined to accounting applications, our focus was on helping organizations derive business value from the use of information and communication technologies. Today, with technology in reach of everyone and the technology sector in ascendance, our mission has expanded to encompass the achievement of human potential and societal benefits.

At the same time, it has become increasingly clear that the potential benefits of technology come with potential risks and harms. While we hope that IT-enabled contact tracing will help the world cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, we also worry about the loss of privacy, security breaches, and discrimination against vulnerable persons and groups. While we applaud the possibilities of big data and analytics in our own research, we are also hear public concerns about the ethicality of social media experiments, the use of proprietary data and unpublished algorithms, the potential for academic misconduct, and the possibility that technology giants will stifle academic inquiry.

In brief, our research community has moved to the center of a social force field characterized by value conflicts and politicized controversies. This is a domain in which our every research design decision, from what to study to how to study it, involves ethical questions. To fulfill our mission as a field, it our responsibility to engage deeply with the notion of responsibility in our research, in the deployment of technology by organizations, and in the societal consequences of information technology and systems.

Embracing this responsibility is a big challenge. It moves us well past our familiar research genres on the topics of security and privacy. It forces us to confront our own motives as well as those of the technology companies that support us in numerous ways. It leads us away from treating the “dark side” of information technology as a niche research topic and toward comprehensive assessments of how the benefits, costs, and risks of technology are distributed across various stakeholder groups.

This conference theme track seeks papers that address the value conflicts and ethical concerns involved in the design, development, deployment, and use of information systems and technologies. Papers relevant to the track might deal with responsible/irresponsible practices or desirable/undesirable impacts (preferably both). We welcome original works taking any methodological or epistemological approach. Both empirical and theoretical papers will be considered, although we particularly encourage submissions including primary data. We will consider both complete research papers as well as research in progress (RIP) papers. Accepted papers will provide (or offer the potential to provide) substantial theoretical and practical contributions to the IS literature. Papers that question mainstream literature, conventional thinking, and hidden assumptions or that provide critical and counterintuitive accounts are particularly encouraged. We particularly seek papers that reflexively examine technology in the context of current events, such as the pandemic, racial unrest, environmental disasters, financial crises, and social inequality.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  •  The costs, benefits, and risks of using contact tracing apps in the context of COVID-19
  •  The uses and misuses of personal data collected through social software via “scraping” the web
  •  The role of the technology sector in shaping the IS research agenda
  •  The role of lobbying by technology sector companies on governmental innovation policies
  •  Multi-level (individual and organizational) investigations of security and privacy
  •  How partnerships between industry, governments, and universities can promote responsible research and innovation
  •  Health risks associated with the digital divide during the current COVID-19 pandemic
  •  Consequences of using artificial intelligence/machine learning in human resource management systems, financial systems, educational systems, criminal justice systems etc.
  •  Research responsibility concerns, including human subjects protection, academic integrity, conflicts of interest, etc.
  •  The uses and consequences of technology in advertising and commerce, including deception and price discrimination
  •  The prospects for, and possible downsides of, pro-societal information systems (e.g., nudging health apps, open government data, ICT for development)
  •  Promoting environmental sustainability in bitcoin mining and blockchain computation
  •  How technology might ameliorate and/or exacerbate the global digital divide
  •  Governance (including oversight and due process) of algorithmic systems in business organizations, governments, or civil society organizations
  •  The promises and perils of automated decision systems
  •  Barriers to responsible organizational uses of data and algorithms and how to overcome them
  •  Education and training for responsible organizational uses of data and algorithms

If you have questions about the suitability of a paper topic for the track, please contact one of the track chairs prior to submission

Track Chairs:

  • Remko Helms, Open University of The Netherlands, Netherlands, remko.helms@ou.nl
  • Tuure Tuunanen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland, tuure.t.tuunanen@jyu.fi
  • Geert Poels, Ghent University, Belgium, geert.poels@ugent.be

Track Description:

The General IS Topics track is intended for high-quality papers on topics that do not have a specific fit with other tracks or have a very comprehensive, cross-thematic scope. The track aims to attract unique and novel papers and give an additional degree of freedom to the conference’s specific tracks, from an epistemological, ontological as well as methodological standpoint.
Please check the detailed descriptions of other tracks before submitting your paper to this track to ensure a good fit with your submission. After a careful assessment, track chairs might move your paper to other tracks.
The General Topics track is also the track to which chairs of other tracks are welcome to submit (since they are not allowed to submit to their own track).
The General Topics track is open to papers that do not have a specific fit with other tracks and to papers that have a very comprehensive, cross-thematic scope.

Track Chairs :

  • Efpraxia Zamani, University of Sheffield, UK, e.zamani@sheffield.ac.uk
  • Konstantina Spanaki, Loughborough University, UK, K.Spanaki@lboro.ac.uk
  • Ilias Pappas, University of Agder (UiA), Norway, ilias.pappas@uia.no

Track Description :

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an umbrella term with an evolving meaning over the last century. AI refers to a vast amount of techniques, tools and technological artefacts. The AI artefacts and techniques range from machine learning, convolution networks, image and speech recognition, to 3D printing and an expanding number of innovative approaches. AI, as a contextual approach with a substantial role, has managed to find its place in a number of areas, ranging from household applications, to healthcare, to warfare, but also in production and the supply chain world.
In this track we would like to focus in the use of AI in IS research and specifically draw our attention on the evolving concepts, practices, processes and methods related to AI-related technology management in various fields. We consider it is timely to investigate into the potential of AI within the IS community, with the view to shed more light in the management of practices and processes. At the same time, it is crucial to reflect on the challenges and the implications stemming out of AI applications. Within a digitally connected world, whereby advanced technologies, such as AI, Information Systems scholars should consider the implications for industry, for society, for individuals and for sustainability.
In this track, we welcome both empirical and conceptual papers, without excluding any methodological stance (qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods etc). 
Potential Topics of Interest (indicative):
  •  AI  concepts, tools and techniques
  •  Challenges and Opportunities (methodological and practical) for AI adoption
  •  Information and Knowledge sharing and the ethical implications around AI in organizations 
  •  The dark side of AI and ethical considerations
  •  AI for decision making in organizational contexts
  •  Swarm and Collective Intelligence for smart applications
  •  Business Process Management and AI
  •  AI capabilities and innovation
  •  Decision-making and Forecasting through AI approaches
  •  Humanitarian applications of AI 
  •  AI in emergent situations and risk management 
  •  Application of AI to address societal challenges
  •  AI for healthcare innovation and management
  •  AI and Information Systems Development
  •  AI for Sustainability and Resilience of processes and practices 
  •  The role of AI in the fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0)
  •  Machine learning, Cyber-physical Systems, Robotics  and AI  automation

Track Chairs :

  • Olgerta Tona, the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, olgerta.tona@ait.gu.se
  • Barbara Dinter, Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany, barbara.dinter@wirtschaft.tu-chemnitz.de
  • Christian Janiesch, University of Würzburg, Germany, christian.janiesch@uni-wuerzburg.de
  • Patrick Mikalef, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway, patrick.mikalef@ntnu.no

Track Description :

Technological advancements have contributed to the generation of massive amounts of data that unleash huge opportunities not only for organizations but also for society. The application of business analytics, business intelligence, and big data approaches enables us to integrate, analyse, visualize, and ultimately understand and improve the complex processes that make up our digitized world. Such approaches are enablers for knowledge discovery transforming societies and organizations. Over the past few years, there has been enthusiasm around business analytics as organizations explore how they can leverage their data to create and maintain a competitive advantage. Improved communication, more sustainable processes, as well as new business models are examples for the innovative use of disparate data sources (such as mobile, the Internet of Things, streaming data or social media data).

In addition to the potential of transforming businesses, business analytics, business intelligence and big data can contribute to better human health and well-being, improved public services, and better support of environmental and climate causes. The datafication of our society can help the drive towards solutions that safeguard and promote human values by creating empowered societies through the use of data, building digital bridges, and maintaining sustainable and inclusive societies among others. 

Motivated by the explosion of interest in these emerging fields, the present track aims to promote multidisciplinary contributions dealing with socio-economic, organizational, technological, cultural, and societal perspectives. We call for submissions based on quantitative and qualitative work, theoretical research, design research, action research, or behavioral research. Furthermore, we encourage papers with outcomes that demonstrate the organizational impact of business analytics and big data in terms of competitive performance, innovativeness, increased agility, and market capitalizing competence. In particular, we welcome papers that discuss and expand our understanding of how the use of business analytics and big data is impacting fundamental human values and society at a larger scale. Please note that papers solely dealing with AI and machine learning algorithms are not the focus of this track.

 Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
  •  The role of business intelligence, business analytics, and big data for new horizons in digitally united societies
  •  Individual and societal empowerment through business analytics and big data
  •  Emerging and changing concepts and methodologies for business analytics and big data
  •  Strategic and change management issues stemming from business analytics and big data
  •  Business value of business analytics and big data
  •  Adoption, routinization, maturity, use, and innovative applications of business analytics and big data
  •  Data privacy, data quality, and data governance
  •  Opportunities and challenges of sharing data and of open data
  •  Data-driven business model innovation and the digital ecosystem big data
  •  Data visualization, visual analytics
  •  Business analytics in the cloud, business analytics as a service
  •  Data, text and social media analytics for business analytics
  •  Process mining and the benefits of robotic process automation
  •  Digital manufacturing and the Internet of Things
  •  Operational, real-time, or event-driven business analytics


Track Chairs :

  • Matti Rossi, Aalto University, Finland, matti.rossi@aalto.fi
  • Juho Lindman, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, juho.lindman@ait.gu.se
  • Kalina Staykova, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, kss.digi@cbs.dk

Track Description :

Blockchain and distributed ledger technologies challenge prevailing myths concerning supremacy of centralised computing architectures and offer new opportunities for developing radically new digital financial services for private and public sector. At the same time, the new technology architecture has been criticized as being ‘unnecessary’ or ‘unfit’ to deal with real issues in finance and beyond, especially due to its weak governance arrangements in permissionless chains and issues around transparency and irreversibility of transactions. 
FinTech, which refers to the use of novel technologies, such as blockchain, to design, deliver and optimize financial services, describes a broad variety of technological interventions within digital finance. In particular, FinTech includes a variety of innovative services within private finance, such as P2P payment platforms, money remittances, saving accounts, P2P lending platforms, alternative credit scoring; within commercial finance such as crowdfunding, WealthTech, security trading without human intervention, and within the operational backbone of traditional financial institutions. 
Blockchain-based applications in this area include for example cryptocurrencies, digital cash, underlying blockchain technology architecture (DLT, including Ethereum), smart contracts and automatic execution of contracts, Open Banking initiatives, InsurTech, RegTech (compliance, AML, KYC), WealthTech (e.g., automatic investment advice), financial services for including underbanked and unbanked people, and cybersecurity approaches and services. 
We are especially interested in research related to new peerless platforms and distributed autonomous organizations (DAOs) and their effect on business ecosystems as well research that investigates whether and how anticipated commercial success materializes and how it is measured. Critical research on blockchain within FinTech area is also welcome to the track: uncertain promises and downright scams (e.g., in ICO heists), breaches of trust, explaining overblown expectations and hype as well as investigating project failures and intentional negative uses are some of the topics, which are important to understand in more detail.
Answering these questions is pivotal from the perspectives of business research and policy making. We believe this space offers a rich terrain for IS theorizing. We also want to encourage strongly empirical work in this area related to both design and use of blockchain-based innovations within the FinTech area. 
Topics for this track include, but are not limited to the following:
  •  Novel approaches to development of blockchain applications
  •  Blockchain and other open platform technologies, such as Ethereum, Hyperledger and Corda
  •  Blockchain platform governance and standards
  •  Cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin, Libra)
  •  ICOs
  •  Fintech applications of BC
  •  Stable coins and central bank backed currencies
  •  Smart contracts
  •  Emerging blockchain ecosystem analyses
  •  Blockchain development methods
  •  Permissionless and permissioned architectures
  •  Permissioning of nodes
  •  Combining traditional database approaches and blockchains
  •  Emergent payment (e.g., B2B, cross-border) platforms based on blockchain
  •  Entry of new actors in the FinTech ecosystem (e.g., TechFins such as ApplePay, AmazonPay, WeChatPay, and so on)
  •  Innovation in Capital Markets (Trading, Crowdfunding, Peer-to-Peer Lending)
  •  Use of blockchain in WealthTech and InsurTech 
  •  Blockchain for financial inclusion
  •  Open Banking 
  •  Regulatory approaches of innovative financial services (regulating ICO, security and utility tokens) and RegTech (AML, security issues, and so on)

Track Chairs :

  • Horst Treiblmaier, Modul University Vienna, Austria, horst.treiblmaier@modul.ac.at
  • Johann Kranz, LMU Munich, Germany, kranz@bwl.lmu.de
  • Melanie Swan, Purdue University, US, swan3@purdue.edu

Track Description :

Blockchain technologies enable the creation of cryptographic tokens, namely representations of tangible (e.g., real estate) or intangible (e.g., patent) assets as tokens that are easy to purchase and trade. A multitude of potential use cases that go far beyond financial applications are currently envisioned and pilots tested, but numerous technical, organizational and legal hurdles still exist which might impede the widespread adoption of a token economy. Furthermore, acceptance among non-institutional end users is still low.

The token economy thus raises numerous important questions, ranging from a critical evaluation of the capabilities and limitations of tokens from a technical perspective toward its applicability to transform economic structures through the tokenization of business processes, real-world assets, and property rights. Additionally, legal and trust issues exist, which are exacerbated by the borderless nature of blockchain technologies. Given the novelty of the token economy, numerous questions regarding the nature of the technology and its potential socio-economic implications need to be solved.

To address these gaps, this track calls for academic research on blockchain-based tokens and their potential technical, economic and social implications. We invite innovative and relevant empirical (qualitative and quantitative) studies as well as design-oriented research and conceptual/theoretical papers. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  •  Token economy and new forms of economic organizing (e.g., co-ops, decentralized platforms, public good provision)
  •  Socio-technical systems view of the token economy
  •  Token-based business models and use cases beyond finance
  •  Economics of tokenized networks
  •  Institutional and user acceptance of cryptographic tokens
  •  Factors influencing the success of token-based business models 
  •  Token taxonomy 
  •  Token-based entrepreneurship 
  •  The role and impact of tokens on venture capital (e.g., ICOs, STOs, IEOs)
  •  Macroeconomic implications of the token economy
  •  Tokens as incentive mechanisms 
  •  Governance of decentralized autonomous organizations (DAOs) and their potentials and limitations
  •  Security and privacy issues of tokens
  •  Legal implications and challenges of a token economy
  •  Philosophical perspectives of a token economy

Track Chairs : 

  • Antonia Köster, University of Potsdam, Germany, antonia.koester@uni-potsdam.de
  • Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen, Aalto University, Finland, virpi.tuunainen@aalto.fi
  • Saonee Sarker, University of Virginia, US, saonee.sarker@comm.virginia.edu

Track Description :

In a growing number of industries, new paths of value creation are enabled by the development of information and communication technologies (ICT). To remain competitive, companies use ICT to transform their existing business models or to facilitate new ones. These digital transformations often affect large parts of organizations, leading to far-reaching changes in the economy and society. Therefore, it is important to understand ICT-enabled changes in value creation and realization, exchanges and combinations of resources, delivery of new digital services and products, process innovation, and thus new digital business models (Hedman and Kalling 2003). In line with the conference theme, companies also have to monitor the impact on society, including ethical implications, of their business models and transformation choices to ensure long-term success.
As an established part of ECIS since 2014, this track will examine the impact of technological developments on the design of business models (Veit et al. 2014). Furthermore, the track includes the question of how companies can successfully manage the digital transformation (Matt et al. 2015). Submissions are encouraged from all theoretical and methodological perspectives drawing from IS, strategic management, and related disciplines. 
Topics include but are not limited to: 
  •  ICT as “enabler” of new business models
  •  Digital transformation of existing business models 
  •  Changes in cost structures or revenue generation through ICT
  •  Effects of ICT on the organizational structure
  •  Management of digital transformation processes and leadership concepts
  •  Development and implementation of digital transformation strategies
  •  Corporate and entrepreneurial culture in the digital age
  •  Development of digital competencies within companies
  •  The impact of ICT on the relationship between firms and their stakeholders
  •  Sustainable digital transformation and organizational performance


References:
Hedman, J. and Kalling, T. (2003). “The Business Model Concept: Theoretical Underpinnings and Empirical Illustrations.ˮ European Journal of Information Systems 12 (1), 49–59.
Matt, C., Hess, T. and Benlian, A. (2015). “Digital Transformation Strategies.ˮ Business & Information Systems Engineering 57 (5), 339–343.
Veit, D., Clemons, E., Benlian, A., Buxmann, P., Hess, T., Kundisch, D., Leimeister, J. M., Loos, P. and Spann, M. (2014). “Business Models – An Information Systems Research Agenda.” Business & Information Systems Engineering 6 (1), 45–53.

Track Chairs :

  • Thomas Grisold, University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein, thomas.grisold@uni.li
  • Jan Mendling, Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien (WU Vienna), Austria, jan.mendling@wu.ac.at
  • Michael Rosemann, Queensland University of Technology, Australia, m.rosemann@qut.edu.au

Track Description :

The rapid emergence of fast maturing technologies such as mobile, social, cognitive, and cloud computing have significant, but still poorly understood implications for the design, automation and overall management of business processes and routines. Designers, managers and users are exposed to unfolding and uncertain dynamics that are hard to anticipate and manage. Whereas the majority of the academic body of BPM knowledge is rooted in the implicit assumption that business environments are relatively stable over time, we are interested in the dynamic relationship between business process work, digital technologies and emerging affordances.
This track invites contributions that explore how digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, process mining, robotic process automation or the Internet of things, change the way we design and manage process work. We are also interested in how these technologies have an impact on the broader organizational context, e.g. organizational culture and governance. Furthermore, we are looking for studies that explore how organizations deal with the increasing availability of data to analyse, improve or prototype business processes and routines. We welcome conceptual and empirical studies that describe, explain or predict implications of digital technologies on modern business process work. We encourage interdisciplinary research integrating theories, methods and findings from other fields, such as organizational and management sciences.


Digital-technology related questions include the following, but are not limited to: 
  •  How does AI change the way we design and manage business processes and routines?
  •  What are methods to guide robotic process automation?
  •  What are innovative, validated approaches in the area of process mining and process analytics?
  •  What are implications of IoT for process design, monitoring and/or management?
  •  How can blockchain be used in business process coordination?
  •  How can digital technologies support resilience of business process work?

Broader implications for BPM, including for example: 
  •  How do digital technologies change organizing in and around business processes and routines?
  •  How do designers, managers and users react to and interact with new technologies?
  •  How can BPM enable adaptive changes in response to unexpected events, such as a global crisis?
  •  How can we effectively deal with “process hibernation”? That is, how can we pause the enactment of processes during a crisis, and how can we revive them eventually?
  •  How can we use various types of data to analyze, improve and prototype business processes?
  •  What are ethical implications of data-driven BPM?
  •  How can we enable agile process designs for highly uncertain business environments?
  •  (How) do we need to rethink the notion of a business process in the context of digital platforms and ecosystems?
  •  How can we design processes to support innovation and entrepreneurial activities?
  •  How can BPM research foster an interdisciplinary dialogue among adjacent research domains, e.g. organizational studies and management science?

Submissions on other BPM-related topics are also welcome. 




Track Chairs :

  • Jeannette Stark, TU Dresden, Germany, Jeannette.stark@tu-dresden.de
  • Christiane Lehrer, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, cl.digi@cbs.dk
  • Kathrin Figl, University of Innsbruck, Austria, kathrin.figl@uibk.ac.at

Track Description :

While digital technologies can contribute to the pursuit towards a sustainable future, digital technology can also be perceived as a threat to our cognitive functioning and wellbeing. In this regard, users may perceive digital technology as a source of constant overwhelm with information and requests to adapt to new technologies. Being overwhelmed can impede focusing on relevant information and may even lead to attention deficit. Overwhelm may be amplified by multitasking on various devices and constant interaction with a smartphone. Therefore, designing digital technology with a focus on cognitive and emotional aspects is increasingly important for targeting and satisfying human needs so that these systems can be used efficiently to contribute to attaining a sustainable future.  
We invite contributions on the design and use of digital technology that reflect cognitive implications, requirements, and consequences as well as address how digital systems can be used to guide human behavior towards a more sustainable future. Cognitive considerations in guiding or “nudging” users’ choices become relevant e.g., by encouraging people to behave socially and environmentally responsible, to adopt a healthier lifestyle, or to buy products. Furthermore, contributions are invited that provide understanding of how digital technology shapes human cognition and emotion and how user interact with technology and algorithms. We welcome novel qualitative and quantitative empirical insights and conceptual research contributing to theory development and offering directions for future research. We especially encourage research grounded in reference disciplines such as cognitive psychology, human-computer interaction, neuroscience, or automated cognition. 

Topics of interest include but are not limited to
  •  effects of digital technologies on human behavior (i.e., at the individual and organizational level) 
  •  shaping cognition, emotion and behavior through emergent technology (e.g., virtual reality, augmented reality, persuasive system design)
  •  user interaction with algorithms, algorithm aversion, and algorithm appreciation
  •  cognitive biases and heuristics in the context of novel digital technologies
  •  differences in thinking when using different devices, smartphones as our “extended mind” 
  •  design of information systems for digital nudging in various domains (e.g., online shopping, online donations, privacy settings, crowdsourcing and funding, energy consumption, choice of healthy products) 
  •  cognitive mechanisms underlying persuasive system design
  •  NeuroIS studies on information systems design and use (i.e., neurocognition, neurophysiology)
  •  cognitive overload and technostress caused by interruptions and consumption of information through digital devices 
  •  fostering creativity in digital settings such as co-creation and crowd-sourcing platforms
  •  evaluation of user experience and user attitudes of innovative interaction designs 
  •  cognitive requirements and consequences of human-centric design of information systems


Track Chairs : 

  • Cinzia Cappiello, Politecnico di Milano, Italy, cinzia.cappiello@polimi.it
  • Christine Legner, University of Lausanne, Switzerland, christine.legner@unil.ch
  • Boris Otto, TU Dortmund University, Germany, Boris.Otto@tu-dortmund.de

Track Description :

Business ecosystems often rely on data and require their members to exchange and share data in a secure and reliable way. This brings about important questions with regard to governance, quality, security, and the value of data. This track particularly focuses on the important role of data governance and data quality in the design, emergence and adoption of ecosystems. 

Data-driven innovation in ecosystems is gaining more and more importance, the EU and its member states have put emphasis on data sharing and the creation of data spaces and platforms. However, there are only a few contributions that discuss topics related to data-quality and data governance in such a scenario. Moreover, research on data-related topics is carried out by scholars taking different disciplinary perspectives, such as AI and data science, management science, or database systems. In order to provide a common ground and further develop this field of research, this track brings together academics and practitioners working on the different aspects related to data governance and quality. 

This track invites contributions from different disciplines and backgrounds, including but not limited to the following: 

  •  Governance of data platforms and ecosystem
  •  Data quality definition, assessment and improvement
  •  Data sharing and multilateral forms of data management
  •  Data privacy, security and sovereignty in ecosystems
  •  Data economics and data accounting
  •  The relationship between data quality and the value of data
  •  Data value chains
  •  Distributed data architectures in business networks and ecosystems


Track Chairs : 

  • Jane Fedorowicz, Bentley University, US, jfedorowicz@bentley.edu
  • Chee-Wee Tan, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, ct.digi@cbs.dk
  • Safa’a AbuJarour, University of Potsdam, Germany, safaa.abujarour@uni-potsdam.de

Track Description :

Recent developments in digital technology have reshaped almost all aspects of our lives: our education, our work, and our social life. Despite the benefits afforded by digital technologies, they often produce challenges that the academic community cannot ignore. This track aims to not only elucidate the opportunities that accompany digitization, but also to reflect on how the information systems community can aid in tackling the challenges brought about by digitization. Essentially, the goal of this track is to raise awareness and generate scholarly debate about the opportunities and challenges for fostering digital inclusion in our increasingly interconnected world. Not only are diversity, equity, and inclusion instrumental in assuring fairness in society and assimilating communities, they also drive the proliferation of skillsets fundamental to the realization of a truly digital society in the foreseeable future. Although the role digital technology plays in society has received attention in the past couple of years, research in this area is still rather fragmented. We do not yet have a coherent body of literature that theorizes about the consequences of digital technology on individuals, communities, and the broader society. 
This track closely aligns with the conference theme, Human Values Crisis in a Digitizing World, in its aspiration for a more just society, in which digital technology constitutes an integral component. This track also considers technology-related topics touching on the intersections between age, culture, disabilities, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status, and how they relate to education, industries, and society in general. 
We welcome submissions – either as full research or research in progress papers – that analyze the equalizing role digital technology plays in different aspects of contemporary life. Submissions could include theory development, literature reviews, or practical teaching cases from various research traditions, including qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods, or design science.
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  •  Opportunities and challenges of digitizing of education, industries, and society
  •  Equality, diversity, and inclusion in technology-enabled education, industries, and society
  •  Ethics of digitization of education, industries, and society
  •  Digital transformation and the future of work
  •  Technology-aided social inclusion 
  •  Online learning platforms for digital inclusion
  •  Digital inclusion of marginalized groups
  •  Inclusion/exclusion dichotomy of social media
  •  Political freedoms in the digital space
  •  Humane computing
  •  Policy and regulations for promoting inclusiveness 
  •  Bridging diversity or inclusivity gaps through digital technologies

Track Chairs:

  • Stefan Morana, Saarland University, Germany, stefan.morana@uni-saarland.de
  • Marc Adam, The University of Newcastle, Australia, marc.adam@newcastle.edu.au
  • Alan Hevner, University of South Florida, US, ahevner@usf.edu
  • Shirley Gregor, Australian National University, Australia, shirley.gregor@anu.edu.au

Track Description :

Interacting with information technology (IT) has become a pervasive element in private, organizational, and societal contexts. Within an increasingly digitised and rapidly transforming world, humans need to constantly adjust to the latest technological developments while taking into account the emerging political, economic, and health circumstances. Similarly, system engineers need to consider the design, implementation, and evaluation of novel artefacts in highly competitive and dynamic environments. Especially the consideration of human values, such as diversity, equity, fairness, and inclusion have gained increasing importance in the design process and the resulting computing artefacts. The interdisciplinary area of design research in Information Systems (IS) is concerned with informing the design of IT artefacts by establishing and applying (design) theories, exploring and testing models with rigorous research, providing design guidelines, as well as designing and evaluating IT artefacts. 

The aim of this track is to stimulate research that extends the scientific knowledge base for design research in IS in general and for a digitally united society in particular. We seek research that produces design knowledge about IT artefacts for addressing real-world problems, methodological contributions for the design of such systems, and research addressing the implications of specific design elements of IS. We welcome a diversity of submissions focusing on designing, developing, and evaluating IT artefacts, adding to the theoretical and methodological knowledge base and exploring tool support for design science research.

Suggested Topics: 
  •  Behavior design, gamification, and persuasive systems
  •  Conversational interfaces, chatbots, and digital assistants
  •  Design processes, principles and evaluation of design, modularity in design in information systems, and theorizing in design science research
  •  Design science and cross-disciplinary research
  •  Emerging methods and tools for design science research
  •  Ethics and legal aspects in design science research
  •  Considering emotion, flow, and technostress in information systems design
  •  Using NeuroIS methods and tools for the design of neuroadaptive systems and interfaces
  •  Participatory design and human-centred design of information systems
  •  Usability and user experience (UX) engineering

High quality and relevant papers from this track will be considered for selection for fast-tracked development towards publication in AIS Transaction on Human-Computer Interaction (http://aisel.aisnet.org/thci/). Selected papers will need to expand in content and length in line with the requirements for standard research articles published in the journal. Although the track co-chairs are committed to guiding the selected papers towards final publication, further reviews may be needed before final publication decision can be made. 


Track Chairs :

  • Helle Zinner Henriksen, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, Hzh.digi@cbs.dk
  • Ulf Melin, Linköping University, Sweden, ulf.melin@liu.se
  • Leif Skiftenes Flak, University of Agder, Norway, leif.flak@uia.no

Track Description : 

The ongoing digitalization of the public sector is a contemporary issue and a fact globally today, and an important part of the transformation of our society. As an ongoing and emergent phenomenon, there is a need to emphasize the smartness using ICT in public sector. In recent years there is a significant emergence of new technologies and tools, and massive investments in large-scale systems in public sector and how they can transform service delivery (e.g. from government the citizens and firms and vice versa, automatization and the use of AI etc.) and public administration structure and culture. On one hand there are many important steps taken in this direction. On the other hand, there are several challenges left for research and practice focusing digitalization in the public sector. A high degree of service delivery is expected in digital agendas and by citizens as more mature users of technology and mobile solutions, and at the same time there are financial constrains forcing more efficient, sustainable, solutions and streamlined design and implementation processes including different stakeholders’ views, governance and values (e.g. Flak and Rose, 2005) including ethical considerations.
There is also a shift in technology and a set of new ways of using technology as a part of a paradigm shift in the digitization of the public sector. Open, linked and big data, together with data analytics is on the agenda (e.g. Janssen et al., 2012), together with social media, transforming the use of technology and also ways of communicating and delivering e-services and channel strategies. Besides this there are also eternal issues and challenges known from the IS field in general that needs to be investigated, such as equal access, implementation, stakeholder involvement (Axelsson et al., 2013), implementation and change strategies and frameworks, benefits realization etc.
The digitization of the public sector has been intensive as described above with many ambitious and innovative ideas in policy making and also in practice. The resources spent on automatization, robotization, transformation, and implementation of internal IT and e-services are vast on one hand and seldom delivered in terms of value and benefits for stakeholders. Even more ambitious goals formulated within the UN's sustainability framework adds both possibilities and challenges to the investments above.
Digitization of the public sector has been labelled as public sector IS/IT or e-government for some time now and starting to be more mature as a research field. However, research in the field is still regarded as being mostly linked to case studies, particular national contexts and the use of non- grand theories (Bannister and Connolly, 2015). This calls for more work on concepts, perspective and use of theory in the field as well as empirical studies using a plethora of perspectives, methods and approaches.
  •  Digital transformation of the public sector in an era of digitally united societies 
  •  Values and paradigms related to public sector digitalization
  •  Conceptual development of IT in public sector labels, e.g. e-government, transforming government, digital government, smart government
  •  Inclusions and digital divides using public sector ICT
  •  Automatization of, and applicatons of RPA and AI in processes
  •  E-services/digital services and multi-channel delivery of services to citizens and businesses
  •  E-government policy, implementation and practice 
  •  Emerging technologies and smart prefixes in the public sector
  •  Implementation of IS - past, present and future in public sector
  •  Participation and involvement of internal and external stakeholders
  •  Identification and identity of citizens and users
  •  Strategies, use and implications of cloud computing in the public sector
  •  Utilization of open, linked and big data in the public sector
  •  Emergence and use of social media in the public sector
  •  Theories and perspectives related to digitization
  •  Strategic policy making process and technology
  •  Co-creation of innovation and services
  •  Privacy, fairness, freedom, risks and threats of digitization
  •  Critical and sustainable perspectives on electronic government


Track Chairs :

  • Hans-Georg Fill, University of Fribourg, Switzerland, hans-georg.fill@unifr.ch
  • Jelena Zdravkovic, Stockholm University, Sweden, jelenaz@dsv.su.se
  • Robert Buchmann, Babeș-Bolyai University of Cluj Napoca, Romania, robert.buchmann@econ.ubbcluj.ro

Track Description :

 The purpose of this track is to focus on a core topic in business and information systems engineering research. Enterprise modelling is an established approach for the conceptual representation, design, implementation and analysis of information systems in general and the support of human communication. It contributes with the conceptualization, implementation, and use of machine-processable languages to facilitate the interaction with complex business and technological scenarios, engage in knowledge management and support organizational engineering. In addition, the development of reference models for selected domains, the design of generic models for enterprise architecture management, and the development of modelling tools are investigated. Enterprise Modelling supports the creation of innovative digital solutions and thus to investigate new horizons for our society in terms of human value-driven digitalization.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
  •  Conceptualization of enterprise modelling methods
  •  Enterprise modelling platforms & tools
  •  Enterprise modelling for disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence and distributed ledger technologies
  •  Semantic-based enterprise modelling and enterprise ontologies
  •  Enterprise architecture modelling
  •  Multi-level enterprise modelling
  •  Enterprise modelling for human value-driven digitalization 
  •  Enterprise modelling for business ecosystems and enterprise architecture
  •  Best practices and use cases 

Arrangements for subsequent journal publications will be sought after with the BISE Journal (Department Enterprise Modeling and Business Ecosystems) and the EMISAJ Journal.



Track Chairs:

  • Christy Cheung, Hong Kong Baptist University, HK, ccheung@hkbu.edu.hk
  • Marten Risius, University of Queensland, Australia, m.risius@business.uq.edu.au
  • Tommy Chan, Northumbria University, UK, tommy.chan@northumbria.ac.uk

Track Description : 

This track aims to develop theoretical and practical insights into issues related to social and ethical implications of information and communication technology (ICT) use, with the goal to thrive towards a sustainable and digitally-enabled future. This track thus aligns with the ECIS 2021 conference theme of “Human Values Crisis in a Digitizing World.” We welcome papers that address knowledge gaps in: (1) the nature of the problem under investigation, (2) negative aspects associated with the problem, and (3) solutions that can mitigate the problem. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  •  Deviant/unintended use of ICTs: Cyberbullying, addiction, polarisation, vigilantism, mis/disinformation, illegitimate surveillance
  •  (Un)ethical uses of ICTs and the data they generate in elections, organisations, marketing
  •  Individual work-related issues of ICT uses: stress, burnout, addiction
  •  Societal issues of current and emerging ICTs on labour market (e.g., unemployment, deskilling, substitution)
  •  Responsible use of ICTs (e.g., ethical ICT governance, ethical guidelines for ICT application, societal concerns in ICT planning and governance)
  •  The role of ICT in social inclusion/exclusion and equality/inequality
  •  Prevention and intervention strategies

The track is open to all methodological approaches. We invite both full research and research-in-progress papers. 

Track Chairs :

  • Heiko Gewald, Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences, Germany, heiko.gewald@hs-neu-ulm.de
  • Doug Vogel, Harbin Institute of Technology, China, vogel.doug@gmail.com
  • Nilmini Wickramasinghe, Swinburne University of Technology & Epworth HealthCare, Australia, nilmini.work@gmail.com

Track Description:

Globally, healthcare systems are struggling with the monumental challenges of providing quality care to a growing, aging population, as well as facilitating the monitoring and management of exponentially increasing chronic diseases such as diabetes or obesity and trying to stem exponentially increasing costs to deliver quality care and access. 
Health IT is expected to deliver a measurable impact on managing these challenges. However, to date, evidence is scarce as to whether Health IT lives up to the promise and the expected benefits from IT have yet to be realized.
This track seeks conceptual, empirical and design science research and research in progress papers that enhance our knowledge on any and all facets of Health IT. 
We specifically look for papers dealing with 
  •  the challenges of the ageing population
  •  well-being / wellness-tourism / medical-tourism
  •  mobile Health solutions and electronic assists

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  •  Behavior changing digital interventions and persuasive technology
  •  Telemedicine and telehealth and their impacts on health and economic outputs
  •  Adoption, diffusion, and assimilation of health information systems
  •  Wearable health devices and their health outcomes
  •  Virtual Communities and their impact on patient empowerment and patient safety.
  •  User-Generated Content and its impact on healthcare practices and providers
  •  Health IT for the physically and cognitively challenged
  •  Design and implementation of health information technologies
  •  Evaluations of EMR, EHR or PHR solutions
  •  Privacy and security of health information
  •  Healthcare analytics and corresponding data visualization
  •  Specific IT/IS adoption and usage patterns of the elderly
  •  Digital health platforms and communities for the elderly
  •  The impact of technology usage on well-being of the elderly
  •  Theories and research frameworks for investigating age-related IS phenomena
  •  Methodological challenges of investigating elderly people's technology usage
  •  Impact of technology training on elderly’s perceptions and behaviors
  •  Effective design of digital technologies for elderly people
  •  Computer and IT-related self-efficacy of the elderly
  •  Understanding of elderly people's technology needs, expectations, and requirements
  •  User interface design, usability and accessibility issues
  •  Integration of elderly people in the design of technology
  •  Non-intrusive or minimally intrusive surveillance for independent living
  •  Design requirements for technologies supporting independent living 
  •  Medication management, compliance, training, and safety for independent living 
  •  Visions for future technologies for elderly people
  •  IOT technologies for assisted living
  •  Meta-analyses and meta-syntheses of research on elderly people and IS 
  •  IT-Security for elderly people (esp. phishing, scamming etc.)
  •  Trust and distrust of elderly people in digital technologies
  •  How IT has enabled and supported patient-centered value-based care
  •  Social Media for the elderly
  •  Patient-, caregiver-, -guardian, and clinician-centric design methods
  •  Convergence and management of consumer and medical devices, informatics, and systems

Track Chairs :

  • Sven Laumer, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, sven.laumer@fau.de
  • Carol Hsu, Tongji University, China, carolhsu@tongji.edu.cn
  •  David Agogo, Florida International University, USA, dagogo@fiu.edu

Track Description :

In 1989, when the technology acceptance model (TAM, Davis 1989) was developed computers were unfamiliar to many organizations. At that time, technologies were designed to automate administrative and transactional work typically by utilizing large enterprise systems. Now digital technologies are ubiquitous in every aspect of our societies, work, and lives. With an unrelenting pace of innovation, technology acceptance includes smartphones, social media, artificial intelligence, wearable devices, IoT, and digital agents (e.g., Siri and Amazon’s Echo), that are used in many new business and personal contexts. Organizations and consumers now face many new dilemmas, new questions, and new uncertainties. On the one side, individuals are challenged to adapt to the changes induced by the infiltration of digital technologies. They might feel a great uncertainty about these technologies and could have the impression that they are unable to deal with this development in both the private and the business world. On the other hand, individuals might use digital technologies to take advantage of the benefits provided to the individual or organization. Some of these heavy users are called ‘digital natives’ as they were born in a world that is used to information technology. Hence, a challenge to explain the adoption of these technologies has been diminished. Nevertheless, these users of digital technologies might become addicted to their use inducing new challenges for individuals, organizations and societies. 

Digital technologies infuse and shape our daily lives, yet many of our core theoretical perspectives derive from the time when computers were new and unknown to many individuals, in general. Hence, this development provides scholarly opportunities to discuss new theoretical underpinnings and methodological approaches that require novel approaches to understand how individuals, organizations or societies adopt and use information technology. Therefore, we would also like to encourage contributions that use new methodological approaches (e.g. big data analytics) to study technology adoption, use and diffusion phenomena. Potential topics using conceptual, analytical, design-oriented, or empirical approaches include (but are not limited to as we also welcome additional IT implementation, adoption and diffusion research): 
  •  Organizational adoption and use of digital technologies
  •  Individual adoption, use, and discontinuance of digital technologies
  •  Factors enabling or inhibiting acceptance and use of digital technologies
  •  Positive and negative consequences of using digital technologies for both organizations and individuals
  •  New theoretical perspectives on acceptance, use and diffusion of digital technologies
  •  New methodological approaches to study acceptance, use and diffusion of digital technologies 

Track Chairs :

  • Jacob Nørbjerg, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, jno.digi@cbs.dk
  •  Gloria Liu, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, China,  glorialiu2007@gmail.com 
  • Manuel Wiesche, TU Dortmund, Germany, manuel.wiesche@tu-dortmund.de

Track Description :

IS Development (ISD) practice, organization and management have been ongoing research topics from the very beginning of Information Systems However, IS development still struggles with high failure rates, measured in delay, budget overruns, and meeting functionality and quality targets. We furthermore now witness changes to the context, technologies, and application domains of ISD. New software development approaches, software platforms, and operating contexts digitize the delivery cycle and pose new questions for how to organize and manage projects and ISD organizations. Phenomena such as agile development, IT platforms, (X)aaS, DevOps, Continuous Development and Deployment, change the composition and operation of IS projects, programmes and departments. Developments in data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence affect team learning and knowledge sharing, mediate collaboration, or even allow machines as new actors in project teams. ISD research has examined IS development from many perspectives, including ISD methods and practices, risk management, organizational learning, top management roles, and ISD and project management methodologies. The current developments in ISD lead us to revisit old, as well as study new themes arising on the horizon of ISD. This track welcomes papers that improve our understanding of IT projects, on the societal, organizational, group, and individual levels. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: - Managing IT projects and software development ecosystems - Choosing and combining ISD approaches; e.g.; agile, traditional, continuous - DevOps; Continuous development and deployment - IT project team dynamics: collaboration, communication, conflict - HR topics in IT project teams: turnover, team composition, well-being, commitment - Innovation in IT work teams - ISD and management in distributed and virtual teams - Governance, risk management and compliance - Leadership, coordination, and control perspectives on IT projects - Socio-technical aspects of IS development and project management 

Track Chairs :

  • Stefan Thalmann, University of Graz, Austria, stefan.thalmann@uni-graz.at
  • Markus Bick, ESCP Europe Business School, France, mbick@escp.eu
  • Stefan Smolnik, University of Hagen, Germany, stefan.smolnik@fernuni-hagen.de

Track Description :

Digitization currently changes the business world as well as the society as whole. In this regard knowledge is still important or becomes even more important. Especially, due to shorter product life cycles the half-life period of knowledge declines. This is a challenge for organizations as well as for the individual and generates new requirements to knowledge management (KM). Additional powerful digital technologies such as cheap sensors generating big amounts of data and advanced data analytic approaches for knowledge discovery have led to substantial changes in knowledge sharing practices. 
This track raises the questions whether and how digitization in general change the socio-technical aspects related to managing organizational knowledge. To reach new horizons, with respect to digitization, the question is how advanced data analytic approaches and AI can support knowledge creation and especially help to externalize implicit knowledge. Further, data-driven technologies seem promising in context detection and, thus, in the delivery of suitable training artefacts and in connecting people.
We welcome both full research papers and research-in-progress papers. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  •  Requirements of digitization towards KM
  •  Knowledge risks arising along digital supply chains
  •  Social and behavioural issues in the context of KM and digitization
  •  KM and technology enhanced learning
  •  AI for technology-mediated social collaboration
  •  Knowledge life cycle and data-driven decision support
  •  Cross-organizational, cross-border and cross-cultural KM in digitized worlds
  •  AI to capture and share knowledge in social networks and distributed contexts
  •  Support for mature KM solutions: KM governance, KM strategies, KM maturity models, and KM performance
  •  System design for new generation KM systems
 

Track Chairs :

  • David Kreps, University of Salford, UK, D.G.Kreps@salford.ac.uk
  • Isabelle Walsh, SKEMA Business School, Université Côte d’Azur, France, isabelle.walsh@skema.edu
  • Ojelanki Ngwenyama , Ryerson University, US, ojelanki@ryerson.ca

Track Description : 

The Philosophy, Theory, and Research Methods Track offers an arena for developing and nurturing philosophical ideas, new/amended approaches to theorizing, and methodological developments that are of critical importance to the debate and development of transformative ideas in the IS discipline. 

Every IS paper has a philosophical grounding, whether explicit, implicit or denied. Failure to clarify the philosophical position of a paper can undermine critical interrogation of its argumentation and knowledge claims. While some may argue their work is pragmatic and declaring a philosophical stance is unnecessary, their argumentation could be made more substantive by referencing the great American pragmatist philosophers who established their position some hundred or more years ago. Unstated, tacit foundational assumptions can mask negative developments and even fatal strategies. In this era of rapid societal digitalization, clarity of philosophical positions is essential for open critical debate. The present age of digital colonization of social life (abstract systems, data surveillance, digital control, platform capitalism, the internet of things, etc) has revealed a dangerously uncritical embrace of digital technologies as it transforms our humanity in unprecedented ways. As IS scientists living and working in this age of rapid societal digitalization and its unknown trajectories, we are responsible for developing forms of knowledge (episteme, techne, phronesis) for critical understanding, explanation, intervention and ethical action concerning IS phenomena. 

Philosophy requires researchers to ask fundamental questions: what constitutes “research," what constitutes "theory," what constitutes “information,” and what constitutes “systems,” and then to open themselves up to whatever difference the questioning will make when they resume their research.  If we embrace the idea that philosophy is thus ultimately a search for self-understanding - the meaning of life - then philosophical reflections on theory and method can help reveal limitations in the assumptions and worldviews of our science practices (knowledge production) and expand our capabilities for understanding the emerging trajectories of societal digitalization and how we might shape it for the benefit of humanity.    


We welcome papers that offer advances to philosophy, methods and theory. We are especially interested in carefully argued and communicatively competent discourses from any philosophical tradition that clearly explicates how that philosophical (tradition) perspective can advance our understanding of IS phenomena and their world relations, broadly, and especially in the particular domain of digital determinism. We invite critical interrogation, analysis, exploration, insight, suggestion, and polemic on the philosophical foundations of the IS discipline, methodologies, worldviews, theoretical models, and self-imposed boundaries. Internal consistency, clarity and coherence in essays on the relevance of such ideas for the discipline will be prized over adherence to standard frameworks or paper genres. Empirical evidence in support of philosophical positions is welcomed, but not required; speculative sorties into perspectives rich with insight are welcomed, but relevance must be clearly highlighted. 

We are also interested in papers that offer any methodological insights and in particular, those related to data and text mining.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:
  •  What are the philosophical foundations of the IS discipline, where do they come from, where are they going, what is right and what is wrong with them? 
  •  How should the philosophical foundations of the IS discipline evolve, to continue to be relevant, to best serve society, to best fulfill the discipline’s potential? 
  •  What insights into the foundations of the discipline of IS – and especially the current crisis of digital determinism - can be gleaned from examining it in the light of particular philosophical approaches? What are the branches of philosophy or who are the major philosophers that IS could benefit from and have been relatively neglected or ignored so far? 
  •  How and to what extent do philosophical foundations (e.g. metaphysics, epistemology, axiology and ethics, and aesthetics) inform theory and methodological practices within IS research, and why has such a deterministic ethos arisen?
  •  How can we improve our representations of the social and of the socio-technical dimensions in our theorizing?
  •  How can philosophy (e.g. of action or of knowledge) inform the relevance of IS research?
  •  What is the structure of theories in IS research?
  •  How can Native IS theory be distinguished from other social-science theories?
  •  How should we go about developing native IS theories? How can we improve the process of theorizing?
  •  What are the philosophical and methodological impacts of emerging paradigms in IS research (e.g., critical realism, design science, engaged scholarship and pluralism)? 
  •  What are predominant methodological trends in IS research? 
  •  Can we look upon existing dominant methodological approaches in IS, with a critical eye?
  •  Can we propose exciting and/or empowering methods that are little applied in IS research?
  •  What is theory in IS research?
  •  What is data/evidence in IS research?

Track Chairs :

  •  Wang, Xiaofeng, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy, xiaofeng.wang@unibz.it
  • Rob Gleasure, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, rg.digi@cbs.dk
  • Lorraine Morgan, National University of Ireland at Galway, Ireland, lorraine.morgan@nuigalway.ie

Track Description : 

Open IT systems describe a wide range of platforms, concepts, and practices. At the heart of these systems is the desire to break down traditional barriers to participation and overcome antiquated structures. This allows people, knowledge, and resources to move and interact more freely, creating new opportunities inside and outside of organizations. This can allow individuals, organizations, markets, and societies to form new relationships and work collectively towards shared goals and develop innovative new solutions for complex problems. 

Such collaborations inevitably present new challenges, as scholars seek to understand and design systems capable of balancing (i) the need to accommodate sustained communities versus the need for dynamic participation (ii) the need to accommodate contrasting values, interests, and motivations. Thus, we invite applied, empirical and theoretical research papers that will contribute to our scholarly understanding of openness and IT. 

The track was part of ECIS from 2013 to 2020 consecutively. We believe the track is an especially good fit with the conference theme in 2021 because the openness of IT solutions and the openness of society are increasingly important at the time of crisis and when human values are threatened. The track contributes to a better understanding of how to build open IT solutions to support open society. A journal special issue/section is under consideration. 

10 Topics of interest to the track:

  •  Open goods and services markets (e.g., open trading environments, sharing economies, etc.)
  •  Open finance (crowdfunding, peer-to-peer lending, cryptocurrencies, etc.)
  •  Open innovation (e.g., crowdsourcing, innovation contests, co-creation, etc.)
  •  Open management and policy-making (e.g. intra-organisation adoption of open principles, distributed consensus systems, etc.)
  •  Open computing platforms (e.g., open APIs, open data, developer ecosystems, etc.)
  •  Open production methods (e.g., open source software, open hardware, microwork, etc.)
  •  Open content strategies (e.g. wikis, social questions and answers, etc.)
  •  Open science and scholarship (e.g., citizen science, open access publishing, open data sets, open educational resources, etc.)
  •  Open societies and cultures (e.g., open IT for developing regions, digital democracies, hacker/maker and other participatory sub-cultures, social media and crisis response, etc.)
  •  Openness as an abstract concept (e.g., frameworks and theories of openness) and research object (e.g. innovative methodological approaches).

Track Chairs : 

  • Jens Poeppelbuss, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany, jens.poeppelbuss@rub.de
  • Lysanne Lessard, University of Ottawa, Canada, Lysanne.Lessard@telfer.uottawa.ca
  • Christoph Breidbach, University of Queensland, Australia, c.breidbach@business.uq.edu.au

Track Description :

This track aims to integrate research perspectives from Service Science and Information Systems (IS) to examine how digital technology transforms service systems. Service Science is a boundary-spanning and inherently interdisciplinary field that aims to analyse and design service systems, configurations of value co-creating actors, in order to advance service innovation in society more broadly. The IS discipline contributed to Service Science research since its inception about 15 years ago. Today, IS focusses on the potential of digital technologies to make service systems increasingly data-driven, smarter, resource-efficient, interconnected and customer-oriented. At the same time, IS also recognizes unintended consequences of data-driven service systems for business, environment, society and our personal lives. As such, Service Science research within the IS discipline contributes to our understanding of chances and pitfalls of a global and digitally connected service society. 
We call for relevant and rigorous research that reaches beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries. The interdisciplinary nature of Service Science supports diversity of research paradigms, including theoretical, empirical and design science. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
  •  Digital service design
  •  Data-driven service innovation
  •  New service business models
  •  Smart services and smart service systems
  •  Servitization of manufacturing
  •  Service innovation processes, concepts, studies, and theory
  •  Information systems and service strategies
  •  Service systems theory
  •  Service networks and service ecosystems
  •  Modelling of services and service systems

Track Chairs :

  • Matthias Trier, Paderborn University, Germany & Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, Mt.digi@cbs.dk
  • Alexander Richter, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, alex.richter@vuw.ac.nz
  • Hanna Krasnova, University of Potsdam, Germany, krasnova@uni-potsdam.de

Track Description :

Social media have become part of the digital work and digital life of millions of users. These platforms facilitate paradigm shifts in the ways we develop relationships, communicate with each other, collaborate, procure goods and services, and exchange information. 
The ubiquitous nature of social media use requires a better understanding of the role and long-term consequences of this phenomenon for digital transformation on individual, organizational and societal levels. It is important to explore opportunities to sustain the relation to human values and to reveal potential threats to our freedoms and in a digitizing world.
On the one hand, proponents argue that social media promote creation of social capital, result in increased interconnectedness, or facilitate empowerment. On the other hand, opponents express strong concerns over the dangers of social media. The sheer quantity and the sensitivity of the information users disclose, gives rise to strong privacy concerns. Other undesirable developments include distraction, addiction, depression, mood disorders. In companies the multivocality, afforded by social media, can yield tensions for organizational coherence. Finally, the phenomenon of fake news has recently emerged as a dangerous development, posing significant challenges for platform providers and users. Considering both positive and negative impacts of social media, managers and policy-makers find themselves confronted with a complex choice of whether these platforms should be regulated and, if so, how. 
This track seeks submissions examining the role social media is playing in transforming the networked society and businesses at large. We especially encourage research that reaches out beyond IS theories, is grounded in multiple reference disciplines and applies new intriguing perspectives to document and understand the transformatory impact of social media and social media-related smartphone use.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
  •  Social media and theories about digital collaboration
  •  Digital leadership and virtual teams
  •  Social channels of enterprise knowledge sharing and collaborative work
  •  Blurring boundaries of private and business (e.g. Consumerization, Shadow IT)
  •  Social media-enabled business models
  •  Organizational networking with social media and collaboration technologies
  •  The development and use of social media analytics
  •  Digital methods for understanding social media collaboration (e.g. design science  approaches, the computational turn; big data methods)
  •  Critical perspectives on social media (e.g. social and information overload; technostress).
  •  Social media and fake news 

Track Chairs : 

  • Ulrich Remus, University of Innsbruck, Austria, ulrich.remus@uibk.ac.at 
  • Nils Urbach,  University of Bayreuth, Germany, nils.urbach@uni-bayreuth.de
  • Martin Wiener, TU Dresden, Germany, martin.wiener@tu-dresden.de

Track Description :

 In the digital age, innovative technologies influence and change established work processes, products, services, and business models by connecting individuals, organizations, machines, and other ‘things’ in new ways, as well as by enabling novel working, collaboration, and automation models (Fitzgerald et al. 2014). To succeed in this highly competitive and dynamic environment, organizations must unfold the potential of advanced digital technologies in their business strategies, transform their work routines, processes and structures, rethink their business models, as well as manage and govern IT infrastructures that are central to their value propositions (Legner et al. 2017). In short, pervasive digitalization has increased the importance of information technology (IT) and transformed the demands placed on organizations in general, and IT functions in particular. Besides ensuring regular IT operations, IT functions are increasingly required to proactively identify technological innovations and to rapidly transfer them into marketable solutions – and with that to directly contribute to their organization’s value proposition (Urbach et al. 2017).
 
In this context, IS strategizing and governance represent key activities for the effective deployment of IT resources and ultimately for value creation through IT. The emergence of new digital technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence [AI], big-data analytics, blockchain, cloud computing) and infrastructures (e.g., digital platforms and ecosystems), novel value-creation processes and work practices (e.g., IT consumerization, human-robot collaboration, resource sharing) along with the availability of unprecedented data volumes challenge existing conceptualizations and theories related to IS strategy and governance (Markus 2017; Newell & Marabelli 2015). For instance, while cloud services may make the IT artefact seemingly disappear, the challenge of governing the design and use of such services and associated IT resources has become even more acute (Schneider & Sunyaev 2016). Digital business models and gig economy platforms that revolve around resource sharing and/or complex product-service offerings not only challenge organizational boundaries, but also established ideas about ownership of resources, tasks, and outputs (Schor 2014). Similarly, while AI-based algorithms can automate business processes, they also highlight the need for data and process governance (Tarafdar et al. 2017). At the same time, in organizations where more ‘traditional’ technologies and work arrangements are still dominant, IS strategy and governance challenges remain highly complex and important (Wiener et al. 2016).
 
The objectives of the proposed track are two-fold. First, from a scholarly research perspective, the objective is to foster and promote novel concepts and theories on IS strategy and governance, with a particular focus on the manifold opportunities and challenges associated with the pervasive digitalization of business and society. Second, the track aims at offering insights that enable IS practitioners to leverage emerging digital technologies, to respond to digitalization challenges, and ultimately, to make effective use of available IT resources.
 
The track is open to all types of contributions—including research in progress—studying IS strategy and governance topics from different stakeholder perspectives, in different contexts and settings (e.g., for-profits and non-profits), at different levels of analysis (e.g., individual, project, program, organizational, network, ecosystem, and societal level), and with different theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches (e.g., conceptual, design-oriented, and empirical studies). We particularly welcome studies that address the conference theme “Human Values Crisis in a Digitizing World” by discussing and expanding our understanding of how digital technologies (e.g., those used for control or governance purposes) and human values influence each other and sometimes conflict, whether at the individual, the organizational and/or the societal level.
 
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  •  Digital strategizing and strategy implementation (e.g., link to overall business strategy, development of digital capabilities, sustainability of digital strategies, translation of strategic objectives into governance practices and structures)
  •  Strategic impact of emerging digital technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence, blockchain, big-data analytics, cloud computing) on business models, governance structures, and processes, etc.
  •  Governance of digital transformation and innovation processes (e.g., new governance models for complex organizations, such as companies operating with coexisting ‘brick and mortar’ and digital business models)
  •  Changing role of CIO function & New role of CDO function (e.g., ‘digital race’ between CIO and CDO, structure and nature of business-IT relationships)
  •  Data-driven leadership and control approaches (e.g., algorithmic management of work processes, technology-mediated control)
  •  Governance of digital value-creation processes and networks (e.g., digital platforms and ecosystems, Industry 4.0 and cyber-physical systems, IT consumerization, IT-enabled product-service systems, resource sharing, etc.)
  •  Governance of novel work practices (e.g., agile software development, human-robot interaction and collaboration) and sourcing models (e.g., crowdsourcing, multi-sourcing, open-sourcing, and back-sourcing)
  •  Information security governance (e.g., cybersecurity frameworks, standards, and policies for critical infrastructures)
  •  Dark side of digital strategies/governance, including ethical issues as well as undesired ecological, economic, and socio-emotional side-effects (e.g., technostress)
  •  Critical reflections on IS strategy and governance in the digital age (e.g., truly ‘new’ features and challenges of digitalization, links to traditional research streams)
  •  Novel theoretical perspectives and research approaches that broaden, or challenge, our understanding of IS strategy and governance in the digital age
 
REFERENCES
Fitzgerald, M., Kruschwitz, N., Bonnet, D., & Welch, M. (2014) “Embracing Digital Technology: A New Strategic Imperative,” MIT Sloan Management Review, 55(2), 1-12.
Legner, C., Eymann, T., Hess, T., Matt, C., Böhmann, T., Drews, P., Maedche, A., Urbach, N., & Ahlemann F. (2017) “Digitalization: Opportunity and Challenge for the Business and Information Systems Engineering Community,” Business & Information Systems Engineering, 59(4), 301-308.
Markus, M. L. (2017) “Datification, Organizational Strategy, and IS Research: What’s the Score?” Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 26(3), 233-241.
Newell, S., & Marabelli, M. (2015) “Strategic Opportunities (and Challenges) of Algorithmic Decision-Making: A Call for Action on the Long-Term Societal Effects of ‘Datification’,” Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 24(1), 3-14.
Schneider, S., & Sunyaev, A. (2016) “Determinant Factors of Cloud-Sourcing Decisions: Reflecting on the IT Outsourcing Literature in the Era of Cloud Computing,” Journal of Information Technology, 31(1), 1-31.
Schor, J. (2014) “Debating the Sharing Economy,” Journal of Self-Governance and Management Economics, 4(3), 1-13.
Tarafdar, M., Beath, C., & Ross, J. (2017) “Enterprise Cognitive Computing Applications: Opportunities and Challenges,” IT Professional, 19(4), 2-8.
Urbach, N., Drews, P., & Ross, J. (2017) “Digital Business Transformation and the Changing Role of the IT Function,” MIS Quarterly Executive, 16(2), ii-iv.
Wiener, M., Mähring, M., Remus, U., & Saunders, C. (2016) “Control Configuration and Control Enactment in Information Systems Projects: Review and Expanded Theoretical Framework,” MIS Quarterly, 40(3), 741-774.